Process Garlic, the many ways we

Still going strong, but with a change in focus.

Task 1 – clean up the gardens, put ’em to bed for the winter. There have been few photo-suiting moments to show y’all but there’s as much opportunity left for that as there is work to be done, which is a lot.

Task 2 – learn to write more clearly.

Task 3 – form like Voltron to process and plant our garlic. We had a big session today to put the little allium ducks in a row. Here’s a preview of what we will be planting in the next week or so, a total of 4320 all within the city limits! This will be the 4th Vancouver growing season for these seeds, we believe they’re getting quite settled in to our climate.

  • Chesnok Red – 600
  • Russian Red – 600
  • Persian Star – 600
  • Yugoslavian – 600
  • Purple Glazer – 440
  • Leningrad – 435
  • Musica – 265
  • Rojo de Castro (creole) – 380
  • Burgundy (creole) – 400

We have a bit of garlic left for sale, excellent for eating and planting, and going for the outrageously low price of $10/lbs. Contact us at info@innercityfarms.com if you’re interested and check out our product profiles to learn about the distinguishing features of our varieties.

  • Chesnok Red – 18.5lbs
  • Persian Star – 11lbs
  • Burgundy Creole – 2lbs (rare variety price exception – $15/lbs)
  • Russian Red – 5lbs
  • Musica – 5lbs
  • Yugoslavian – 3.5lbs 

Throughout the sorting process, there is always a percentage of garlic that is perfectly edible but not quite fit for public sale. We place those cloves aside and send them home with the help. Here are a few images of one way of dealing with an excess of garlic that needs to be used up asap before it succumbs to the rot.

Materials: Garlic seconds, jars, olive oil, food processor, cutting board and knife
Picked over and peeled
Into the food processor at a 3:1 garlic to olive oil portioning
A few quick pulses
Jarred up and ready for the freezer

One note of caution, put the jars in the freezer right away. If the jars are left at room temperature, we are creating a nice habitat for botulism-causing bacteria. Here’s some more info on the risks.

We let the jar sit on the counter for a few minutes so it thaws enough to scoop some out, then we throw it right back in the freezer.

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