Porcelain Garlic, Yugoslavian

Porcelain Garlic, Yugoslavian

Yugoslavian Porcelain,
considered a rare heirloom
variety originating from the
country which used to be
Yugoslavia. It was brought to
the Kootenay and Okanagan
regions of Western Canada,
where most of this variety is
now cultivated.
Yugoslavian Porcelain is one
of our hottest Porcelains.
It has a strong garlic aroma
with a pungency that is not
overwhelmingly sulfurous. Its
f lavour begins intensely, initially
hot and spicy, which mellows
to a warm pleasant, sweet
aftertaste.
Yugoslavian garlics have copperveined
and purple blotched
cloves which fade to white as
the bulbs dry.

The Porcelain Family
Porcelains are the largest garlic plants and have the largest bulbs. However,
while the bulbs are of impressive size, each bulb contains fewer very large
sized cloves – making them a relatively expensive crop to grow, and therefore
less available commercially. For farmers, this means that if you have a bulb
with four cloves, a fourth of your harvest must be replanted to generate next
year’s crop.
Porcelain garlics are typically all white, hence the name “Porcelain”,
although purple or copper streaking may sometimes appear depending
on growing conditions and cultivar. The skins of these garlics cling tightly
to the clove which lend them the ability to store quite well and for longer
periods of time.
As a group, Porcelains have among the highest yields of allicin, the sulfur
compound most associated with garlic’s therapeutic benefits. The trade-off
is that they can taste a bit sulfurous and unsubtle. Porcelains have intensity
and work well with dishes that call for a more direct aggressive garlic
character. As a group, Porcelains are sometimes thought to be more more
appealing than Silverskins, which can be sulfurously aggressive to a crude
and unkind degree.