Porcelain Garlic, Leningrad

Porcelain Garlic, Leningrad

Leningrad has thick white
luxuriant bulb wrappers which
peel away to reveal beautiful
purple clove covers with
elongated tips almost like a
Purple Stripe garlic. When
eaten raw, its f lavour starts off
mild with smooth mellow tones
without evidence of heat. This
then progresses to a pungent
hot climax with a lasting
aftertaste. It has been referred
to as a “Russian time bomb”.
When cooked, Leningrad has
a pleasant straightforward
garlic character with perhaps
a bit more complexity than the
average porcelain garlic.

The Porcelain Family
Porcelains are the largest garlic plants and have the largest bulbs. However,
while the bulbs are of impressive size, each bulb contains fewer very large
sized cloves – making them a relatively expensive crop to grow, and therefore
less available commercially. For farmers, this means that if you have a bulb
with four cloves, a fourth of your harvest must be replanted to generate next
year’s crop.
Porcelain garlics are typically all white, hence the name “Porcelain”,
although purple or copper streaking may sometimes appear depending
on growing conditions and cultivar. The skins of these garlics cling tightly
to the clove which lend them the ability to store quite well and for longer
periods of time.
As a group, Porcelains have among the highest yields of allicin, the sulfur
compound most associated with garlic’s therapeutic benefits. The trade-off
is that they can taste a bit sulfurous and unsubtle. Porcelains have intensity
and work well with dishes that call for a more direct aggressive garlic
character. As a group, Porcelains are sometimes thought to be more more
applealing than Silverskins, which can be sulfurously aggressive to a crude
and unkind degree.